Bird Families

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The wonderful bird of paradise (Lophorina superba) is a representative of the order of passerine birds among the birds of paradise. Like sparrows, these birds are quite small. Their body size is approximately 23 centimeters long, and the weight of the bird itself is only about 80 grams. These birds of paradise live in the mountain forests of Western New Guinea, while the area should rise more than 2,000 meters above sea level.

Genus: Wonderful Birds of Paradise

The wonderful bird of paradise feeds on seeds, insects, and small fruits from trees. Sometimes they are able to catch small frogs or lizards. Males are polygamous. They can mate with several females. Females single-handedly make a nest in a tree, incubate eggs and take care of chicks. The wonderful birds of paradise usually have one or two eggs in one clutch. After 18 days, the chicks are already beginning to be covered with feathers.

The plumage of the bird in the female is rather variegated (brown-white-gray), but in the male it is velvety-black, but there are turquoise feathers on the breast. The female is slightly smaller than the male in size and in the size of the wings.

These wonderful birds of paradise became famous for their dance, with which the male attracts the female's attention. During the dance, the male spreads his wings, turquoise feathers on the breast and turns into a black ball with a contrasting turquoise shield on the chest with bright spots from the eyes. The spectacle is really worthy. Below is a video where you can watch the dance with your own eyes, because you cannot describe it in words.

Video of the mating dance of a wonderful bird of paradise

Birds live either alone, or rarely keep in pairs. And during the mating season, the birds gather and the males begin to start their original mating dance, uttering cries and attracting the female. After the dance, the female evaluates the male and makes her decision.

Scientists suggest that in fact the female evaluates not so much the dance of the male as the state of the turquoise feathers. It is by the color of the turquoise plumage that the female determines how ready the male is for mating. In older representatives of this species, turquoise feathers become more faded.

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